Some of the food I had while I was in Japan:

  1. Unagi at Fukinuki in Shinjuku, Tokyo
  2. Sashimi (can’t remember from what fish) at Sobatto in Kanda, Tokyo
  3. Tonkatsu at Tonpei in Sugamo, Tokyo
  4. Burger (which looked better that it was so no recommendation)
  5. Matcha somewhere near Kiyomizu-dera in Kyoto
  6. Niku-Dofu. Tofu with meat (suck on that, stupid vegetarians) at Sobatto in Kanda, Tokyo
  7. Soba and Tempura at Sobatto in Kanda, Tokyo
  8. Yakiniku with beef from Yamagata (probably Yonezawa) at Gyūbei in Funabashi, Tokyo
  9. Burger at Cafe Hohokam in Harajuku, Tokyo
  10. Butter Chicken Curry at Dipmahal Yotsuya Sanchōme, Tokyo (One of my must-haves when in Tokyo)
  11. Sushi (Anago) in Kyoto (can’t remember where)
  12. Same as 1.
  13. Sushi (Chūtoro) (also at that Kyoto place I can’t remember)
  14. Yakiniku at Yakiniku-Torajien in Akiba Tolim, Akihabara, Tokyo
  15. Donburi with a variety of fish at Wakasaya in Kyoto

Oh yeah, the best thing: I lost 1 kilo despite eating all this (and more)

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A Cynic Looks at Life

It is admitted that the South Sea islander in a state of nature is overmuch addicted to the practice of eating human flesh; but concerning that I submit: first, that he likes it; second, that those who supply it are mostly dead. It is upon his enemies that he feeds, and these he would kill anyhow, as we do ours. In civilized, enlightened and Christian countries, where cannibalism has not yet established itself, wars are as frequent and destructive as among the maneaters. The untitled savage knows at least why he goes killing, whereas our private soldier is commonly in black ignorance of the apparent cause of quarrel—of the actual cause, always. Their shares in the fruits of victory are about equal, for the chief takes all the dead, the general all the glory.

This is from “A Cynic Looks at Life” found over at Project Gutenberg.
I should find more time to read.

Life after the Tohoku Earthquake 3

I’m happy to announce the release of the third in a series of short interviews I did regarding the Tohoku earthquake of 2011. My interview partner is Oliver Reichenstein who runs the well known design office iA.

Please tell your friends if you think this is interesting, reblog or retweet!

From Chrissy Angliker’s tumblr:

Bubblegum Nude, the Movie. 2013

…Is compiled of 22 out of 80 process shots of the Bubblegum Nude Painting. She was a piece of work! Don’t judge a painting by its cover <3

( The Painting will be on display at my next show August 30th in Switzerland. Yey! will share invite soon! And Video will be on display in November at my New York show. Allllsssooo stay tuned :)

So Chrissy thinks I&#8217;m a RADDD dude huh? Well… No argument there!

One week of shooting with this RADDD dude, Niko Kitsakis! He is making a short movie documenting my work and I, here in Brooklyn and in Switzerland. To be released end of this year. I’m very flattered and humbled to be a part of thissss… Thank you Nikooooo!!! Bon Voyage!
Zoom Info

So Chrissy thinks I’m a RADDD dude huh? Well… No argument there!

One week of shooting with this RADDD dude, Niko Kitsakis! He is making a short movie documenting my work and I, here in Brooklyn and in Switzerland. To be released end of this year. I’m very flattered and humbled to be a part of thissss… Thank you Nikooooo!!! Bon Voyage!

Hideyuki Kamon makes Kakejiku – the hanging scrolls you see in japanese tea rooms, temples or traditional guest houses. He is what is called a “Hyōgushi”, a scroll mounter.

In 2012, I visited him in Takarazuka, Japan where he lives and works. In the course of three days, he showed me all the steps it takes to assemble a Kakejiku from paper and fabric.

If you’re interested in learning more:
Mr. Kamon’s Website (Japanese)
• Wikipedia article on Kakejiku
Japanese Homes and Their Surroundings by Edward S. Morse

I hope you enjoy the film. Please give feedback or I will be unable to do better next time!

Life after the Tohoku Earthquake 2

After a long delay, I’m happy to announce the release of the second in a series of short interviews I did in Japan. My interview partner is Kenji Shida who owns a bar in Minamisōma.

Please tell your friends if you think this is interesting, reblog or retweet!

This book called “Traditional Designs of Nippon” is a small gem. I was about to write a little text about it but instead found this description from an art book store in Australia (where you can also buy it online):

Comprehensive illustrated encyclopaedia of design that covers all sorts of handmade objects that are presented organised in 39 categories, including architectural structures, furniture, furnishings, armour worn by generals, clothing and religious objects. The collection of 2,200 drawings, produced by Hanzo Koda, have been assembled to serve as a record of historical Japanese objects while also providing the reader with a striking visible background to the different periods in Japanese history and culture.

Pity though that all the descriptions are in Kanji only without ruby (and that – as one of my japanese friends confirmed for me while flipping through the pages of this book – is a problem even for japanese native speakers).
That&#8217;s no show stopper though, even if you read no japanese at all. The book is printed nicely (as japanese books always are) and is dirt cheap too.
You can get it from the aforementioned source or Amazon Japan, and I recommend you do.
Update:Georgie from Ireland tells me, she&#8217;s having problems ordering from Amazon.co.jp.They won&#8217;t let her set up an account because she&#8217;s not living in Japan. I don&#8217;t have that problem here in Switzerland (although I haven&#8217;t ordered anything in 2013 yet). Any of you run into a problem like this with Amazon Japan? Please let me know via email (find the address on my website)
Zoom Info
This book called “Traditional Designs of Nippon” is a small gem. I was about to write a little text about it but instead found this description from an art book store in Australia (where you can also buy it online):

Comprehensive illustrated encyclopaedia of design that covers all sorts of handmade objects that are presented organised in 39 categories, including architectural structures, furniture, furnishings, armour worn by generals, clothing and religious objects. The collection of 2,200 drawings, produced by Hanzo Koda, have been assembled to serve as a record of historical Japanese objects while also providing the reader with a striking visible background to the different periods in Japanese history and culture.

Pity though that all the descriptions are in Kanji only without ruby (and that – as one of my japanese friends confirmed for me while flipping through the pages of this book – is a problem even for japanese native speakers).
That&#8217;s no show stopper though, even if you read no japanese at all. The book is printed nicely (as japanese books always are) and is dirt cheap too.
You can get it from the aforementioned source or Amazon Japan, and I recommend you do.
Update:Georgie from Ireland tells me, she&#8217;s having problems ordering from Amazon.co.jp.They won&#8217;t let her set up an account because she&#8217;s not living in Japan. I don&#8217;t have that problem here in Switzerland (although I haven&#8217;t ordered anything in 2013 yet). Any of you run into a problem like this with Amazon Japan? Please let me know via email (find the address on my website)
Zoom Info
This book called “Traditional Designs of Nippon” is a small gem. I was about to write a little text about it but instead found this description from an art book store in Australia (where you can also buy it online):

Comprehensive illustrated encyclopaedia of design that covers all sorts of handmade objects that are presented organised in 39 categories, including architectural structures, furniture, furnishings, armour worn by generals, clothing and religious objects. The collection of 2,200 drawings, produced by Hanzo Koda, have been assembled to serve as a record of historical Japanese objects while also providing the reader with a striking visible background to the different periods in Japanese history and culture.

Pity though that all the descriptions are in Kanji only without ruby (and that – as one of my japanese friends confirmed for me while flipping through the pages of this book – is a problem even for japanese native speakers).
That&#8217;s no show stopper though, even if you read no japanese at all. The book is printed nicely (as japanese books always are) and is dirt cheap too.
You can get it from the aforementioned source or Amazon Japan, and I recommend you do.
Update:Georgie from Ireland tells me, she&#8217;s having problems ordering from Amazon.co.jp.They won&#8217;t let her set up an account because she&#8217;s not living in Japan. I don&#8217;t have that problem here in Switzerland (although I haven&#8217;t ordered anything in 2013 yet). Any of you run into a problem like this with Amazon Japan? Please let me know via email (find the address on my website)
Zoom Info
This book called “Traditional Designs of Nippon” is a small gem. I was about to write a little text about it but instead found this description from an art book store in Australia (where you can also buy it online):

Comprehensive illustrated encyclopaedia of design that covers all sorts of handmade objects that are presented organised in 39 categories, including architectural structures, furniture, furnishings, armour worn by generals, clothing and religious objects. The collection of 2,200 drawings, produced by Hanzo Koda, have been assembled to serve as a record of historical Japanese objects while also providing the reader with a striking visible background to the different periods in Japanese history and culture.

Pity though that all the descriptions are in Kanji only without ruby (and that – as one of my japanese friends confirmed for me while flipping through the pages of this book – is a problem even for japanese native speakers).
That&#8217;s no show stopper though, even if you read no japanese at all. The book is printed nicely (as japanese books always are) and is dirt cheap too.
You can get it from the aforementioned source or Amazon Japan, and I recommend you do.
Update:Georgie from Ireland tells me, she&#8217;s having problems ordering from Amazon.co.jp.They won&#8217;t let her set up an account because she&#8217;s not living in Japan. I don&#8217;t have that problem here in Switzerland (although I haven&#8217;t ordered anything in 2013 yet). Any of you run into a problem like this with Amazon Japan? Please let me know via email (find the address on my website)
Zoom Info
This book called “Traditional Designs of Nippon” is a small gem. I was about to write a little text about it but instead found this description from an art book store in Australia (where you can also buy it online):

Comprehensive illustrated encyclopaedia of design that covers all sorts of handmade objects that are presented organised in 39 categories, including architectural structures, furniture, furnishings, armour worn by generals, clothing and religious objects. The collection of 2,200 drawings, produced by Hanzo Koda, have been assembled to serve as a record of historical Japanese objects while also providing the reader with a striking visible background to the different periods in Japanese history and culture.

Pity though that all the descriptions are in Kanji only without ruby (and that – as one of my japanese friends confirmed for me while flipping through the pages of this book – is a problem even for japanese native speakers).
That&#8217;s no show stopper though, even if you read no japanese at all. The book is printed nicely (as japanese books always are) and is dirt cheap too.
You can get it from the aforementioned source or Amazon Japan, and I recommend you do.
Update:Georgie from Ireland tells me, she&#8217;s having problems ordering from Amazon.co.jp.They won&#8217;t let her set up an account because she&#8217;s not living in Japan. I don&#8217;t have that problem here in Switzerland (although I haven&#8217;t ordered anything in 2013 yet). Any of you run into a problem like this with Amazon Japan? Please let me know via email (find the address on my website)
Zoom Info
This book called “Traditional Designs of Nippon” is a small gem. I was about to write a little text about it but instead found this description from an art book store in Australia (where you can also buy it online):

Comprehensive illustrated encyclopaedia of design that covers all sorts of handmade objects that are presented organised in 39 categories, including architectural structures, furniture, furnishings, armour worn by generals, clothing and religious objects. The collection of 2,200 drawings, produced by Hanzo Koda, have been assembled to serve as a record of historical Japanese objects while also providing the reader with a striking visible background to the different periods in Japanese history and culture.

Pity though that all the descriptions are in Kanji only without ruby (and that – as one of my japanese friends confirmed for me while flipping through the pages of this book – is a problem even for japanese native speakers).
That&#8217;s no show stopper though, even if you read no japanese at all. The book is printed nicely (as japanese books always are) and is dirt cheap too.
You can get it from the aforementioned source or Amazon Japan, and I recommend you do.
Update:Georgie from Ireland tells me, she&#8217;s having problems ordering from Amazon.co.jp.They won&#8217;t let her set up an account because she&#8217;s not living in Japan. I don&#8217;t have that problem here in Switzerland (although I haven&#8217;t ordered anything in 2013 yet). Any of you run into a problem like this with Amazon Japan? Please let me know via email (find the address on my website)
Zoom Info
This book called “Traditional Designs of Nippon” is a small gem. I was about to write a little text about it but instead found this description from an art book store in Australia (where you can also buy it online):

Comprehensive illustrated encyclopaedia of design that covers all sorts of handmade objects that are presented organised in 39 categories, including architectural structures, furniture, furnishings, armour worn by generals, clothing and religious objects. The collection of 2,200 drawings, produced by Hanzo Koda, have been assembled to serve as a record of historical Japanese objects while also providing the reader with a striking visible background to the different periods in Japanese history and culture.

Pity though that all the descriptions are in Kanji only without ruby (and that – as one of my japanese friends confirmed for me while flipping through the pages of this book – is a problem even for japanese native speakers).
That&#8217;s no show stopper though, even if you read no japanese at all. The book is printed nicely (as japanese books always are) and is dirt cheap too.
You can get it from the aforementioned source or Amazon Japan, and I recommend you do.
Update:Georgie from Ireland tells me, she&#8217;s having problems ordering from Amazon.co.jp.They won&#8217;t let her set up an account because she&#8217;s not living in Japan. I don&#8217;t have that problem here in Switzerland (although I haven&#8217;t ordered anything in 2013 yet). Any of you run into a problem like this with Amazon Japan? Please let me know via email (find the address on my website)
Zoom Info

This book called “Traditional Designs of Nippon” is a small gem. I was about to write a little text about it but instead found this description from an art book store in Australia (where you can also buy it online):

Comprehensive illustrated encyclopaedia of design that covers all sorts of handmade objects that are presented organised in 39 categories, including architectural structures, furniture, furnishings, armour worn by generals, clothing and religious objects. The collection of 2,200 drawings, produced by Hanzo Koda, have been assembled to serve as a record of historical Japanese objects while also providing the reader with a striking visible background to the different periods in Japanese history and culture.

Pity though that all the descriptions are in Kanji only without ruby (and that – as one of my japanese friends confirmed for me while flipping through the pages of this book – is a problem even for japanese native speakers).

That’s no show stopper though, even if you read no japanese at all. The book is printed nicely (as japanese books always are) and is dirt cheap too.

You can get it from the aforementioned source or Amazon Japan, and I recommend you do.

Update:
Georgie from Ireland tells me, she’s having problems ordering from Amazon.co.jp.They won’t let her set up an account because she’s not living in Japan. I don’t have that problem here in Switzerland (although I haven’t ordered anything in 2013 yet). Any of you run into a problem like this with Amazon Japan? Please let me know via email (find the address on my website)